it's your world for the moment

Saturday, October 24, 2020 12:00pm to 5:00pm

+ 8 dates

  • Tuesday, October 27, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Wednesday, October 28, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Thursday, October 29, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Friday, October 30, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Saturday, October 31, 2020 12:00pm to 5:00pm
  • Tuesday, November 3, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Wednesday, November 4, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm
  • Thursday, November 5, 2020 10:00am to 5:00pm

492 Prillaman Way NW, Kennesaw, GA 30144

#ZuckermanMuseum
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The group exhibition it's your world for the moment brings rare and never-been-seen work of historical and cultural significance to the Southeast while also supporting the commissioning of new work made within our region. The precariousness of our geographic and shared spaces is explored through ‘environmental portraits’, explorations into ecological sites, and art-making tactics that incorporate cultural and symbolic meanings of both our natural and cultural spaces. Each artist in this exhibition has inexhaustibly created works of art uniquely positioned in the present while having a simultaneous relationship with the past and future. Their work collectively engages concepts of water and land in all of its complexity and precariousness, while rigorously engaging ideas of our climate and shared geography. Each artist included has explored our lived human experience here on Earth. 

 

Featured artists: Allison Janae Hamilton, Yoshua Okón, Erin Jane Nelson, Ana Mendieta, and Optics Division of the Metabolic Studio (Lauren Bon, Rich Nielsen, and Tristan Duke).

 

Ecocritic Elizabeth Giddens interviewed Erin Jane Nelson in her studio in February 2020. They discussed Nelson’s concerns about how climate change is affecting human communities as well as the natural world. Nelson shared her intellectual and intuitive approach to several pieces in the ZMA show It’s your world for the moment. She also described features of her technique such as hapa-zome printing.

 

In her essay Solastalgizing the Georgia Coast, Giddens interprets Nelson’s practice through the lens of ecocriticism and highlights the themes of solastalgia, anthropomorphism, and posthumanism that emerge from her sculptures, collages, and wall panels.

Access the essay HERE. It is also available on Giddens’ web page.

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